top of page

Grupo Aprecio Viajar

Público·12 miembros

A Practical Guide to Caring for People in Crisis: What You Need to Know from Helping Those Who Hurt



Helping Those Who Hurt: A Handbook for Caring and Crisis




Have you ever felt helpless or overwhelmed when faced with someone who is hurting or going through a crisis? Do you wish you had more skills and confidence to offer comfort and guidance to those in need? If so, you are not alone. Many people struggle with knowing how to help those who hurt, whether they are family members, friends, neighbors, co-workers, or church members.




Helping Those Who Hurt: A Handbook For Caring And catalog control trad



Fortunately, there is a book that can help you become a more effective caregiver. It is called Helping Those Who Hurt: A Handbook for Caring and Crisis, written by Barbara Roberts, a seasoned counselor and director of a large caring ministry department. This book is a practical and comprehensive guide that teaches you how to care for others encountering life crises such as illness, hospitalization, death, troubled marriage, addiction, suicide, and more.


In this article, we will give you an overview of what this book offers and why it is a valuable resource for anyone who wants to help those who hurt. We will also provide some examples of how you can apply its principles and skills in your own life and ministry.


The Four Stages of Crisis




One of the first things that this book teaches you is how to understand the nature and dynamics of crisis. A crisis is a sudden or unexpected event that disrupts a person's normal functioning and causes emotional distress. Crises can be personal or collective, natural or human-made, acute or chronic.


The book explains that people go through four stages of crisis: shock, denial, anger, and acceptance. Each stage has its own characteristics and challenges that affect how people cope and respond. For example, in the shock stage, people may feel numb, confused, or disoriented. In the denial stage, they may try to avoid or minimize the reality of the situation. In the anger stage, they may express frustration, resentment, or blame toward themselves or others. In the acceptance stage, they may begin to adapt and adjust to the new circumstances.


As a caregiver, you need to be aware of these stages and how they influence people's emotions, thoughts, behaviors, and spiritual beliefs. You also need to know how to respond appropriately and sensitively to each stage. For instance, in the shock stage, you may need to provide physical and emotional support, such as a hug, a listening ear, or a reassuring word. In the denial stage, you may need to gently confront and challenge the person's false assumptions or rationalizations. In the anger stage, you may need to validate and empathize with the person's feelings without taking them personally or judging them. In the acceptance stage, you may need to encourage and empower the person to take positive steps toward recovery and healing.


The Seven Principles of Caring




The next thing that this book teaches you is how to follow the seven principles of caring. These are the foundational values and attitudes that guide your actions and interactions when helping those who hurt. They are:



  • Love: You care for others because you love them as God loves them, not because you expect anything in return.



  • Compassion: You care for others by feeling and sharing their pain, not by pitying or patronizing them.



  • Humility: You care for others by serving them with respect and dignity, not by dominating or manipulating them.



  • Integrity: You care for others by being honest and trustworthy, not by lying or betraying them.



  • Wisdom: You care for others by using sound judgment and discernment, not by acting impulsively or recklessly.



  • Grace: You care for others by forgiving and accepting them, not by condemning or rejecting them.



  • Faith: You care for others by trusting and relying on God, not by doubting or depending on yourself.



These principles are based on biblical teachings and examples of how Jesus cared for people. They are also supported by research and experience of what works best in helping people cope with crisis. By applying these principles in your caring ministry, you will be able to show God's love and compassion to those who hurt in a way that honors them and glorifies Him.


The Ten Skills of Caring




The third thing that this book teaches you is how to master the ten skills of caring. These are the practical abilities and techniques that help you communicate and connect with those who hurt. They are:



  • Listening: You care for others by paying attention and understanding what they say and mean, not by interrupting or ignoring them.



  • Questioning: You care for others by asking open-ended and clarifying questions that elicit more information and insight, not by interrogating or accusing them.



  • Reflecting: You care for others by paraphrasing and summarizing what they say and feel, not by repeating or lecturing them.



  • Empathizing: You care for others by expressing sympathy and compassion for their situation and emotions, not by minimizing or dismissing them.



  • Affirming: You care for others by acknowledging and appreciating their strengths and efforts, not by criticizing or discouraging them.



  • Informing: You care for others by providing relevant and accurate information that helps them make informed decisions, not by withholding or misleading them.



  • Advising: You care for others by offering helpful and appropriate suggestions that empower them to take action, not by imposing or dictating them.



  • Confronting: You care for others by challenging and correcting their harmful or unrealistic beliefs or behaviors, not by attacking or blaming them.



  • Referring: You care for others by connecting them with other sources of support or assistance that meet their needs, not by abandoning or isolating them.



  • Praying: You care for others by talking to God with them about their concerns and requests, not by preaching or judging them.



These skills are based on proven principles and practices of effective communication and counseling. They are also adaptable and applicable to different situations and contexts. By developing these skills in your caring ministry, you will be able to help those who hurt in a way that respects their autonomy and promotes their well-being.


The Five Types of Caring




The Five Types of Caring




The fourth thing that this book teaches you is how to provide the five types of caring. These are the different levels and modes of intervention that correspond to different needs and situations. They are:



  • Presence: You care for others by being with them and showing them that they are not alone.



  • Support: You care for others by giving them practical and emotional assistance and encouragement.



  • Counsel: You care for others by helping them explore and resolve their problems and conflicts.



  • Guidance: You care for others by teaching them biblical principles and values that direct their lives.



  • Referral: You care for others by connecting them with other sources of support or assistance that meet their needs.



These types of caring are based on a continuum of care model that recognizes the diversity and complexity of human needs and situations. They are also flexible and complementary, meaning that you can use more than one type of caring at a time or switch between them as needed. By providing the appropriate type of caring for each person and circumstance, you will be able to help those who hurt in a way that matches their needs and expectations.


The Six Areas of Caring




The fifth thing that this book teaches you is how to offer the six areas of caring. These are the various aspects of life and ministry that require or involve caring. They are:



  • Personal: You care for others by attending to their physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual well-being.



  • Relational: You care for others by fostering healthy and harmonious relationships with themselves, others, and God.



  • Situational: You care for others by responding to their specific needs and challenges in different contexts and settings.



  • Developmental: You care for others by facilitating their growth and maturity in different stages and domains of life.



  • Preventive: You care for others by helping them avoid or reduce potential risks and problems in the future.



  • Restorative: You care for others by helping them recover and heal from past wounds and traumas.



These areas of caring are based on a holistic and comprehensive view of human life and ministry that considers all the dimensions and factors that affect people's well-being and functioning. They are also interrelated and interdependent, meaning that they influence and impact each other in various ways. By offering holistic and comprehensive care in each area, you will be able to help those who hurt in a way that addresses their whole person and situation.


The Eight Challenges of Caring




The sixth thing that this book teaches you is how to overcome the eight challenges of caring. These are the common difficulties and obstacles that you may encounter or face when helping those who hurt. They are:



  • Boundaries: You care for others by setting and maintaining healthy limits and expectations in your relationships, not by becoming too involved or detached.



  • Burnout: You care for others by taking care of yourself physically, emotionally, mentally, and spiritually, not by neglecting or exhausting yourself.



  • Conflict: You care for others by resolving disagreements and disputes in a constructive and respectful way, not by avoiding or escalating them.



  • Criticism: You care for others by receiving feedback and correction in a humble and teachable way, not by rejecting or resenting them.



  • Crisis: You care for others by managing stress and pressure in a calm and confident way, not by panicking or collapsing.



  • Change: You care for others by adapting to new situations and circumstances in a flexible and positive way, not by resisting or complaining about them.



  • Culture: You care for others by respecting and appreciating their diversity and differences, not by stereotyping or discriminating against them.



  • Credibility: You care for others by living out what you believe and teach in a consistent and authentic way, not by being hypocritical or dishonest.



These challenges are based on the reality and complexity of human life and ministry that involve various stressors and demands. They are also opportunities and tests, meaning that they can help you grow and improve as a caregiver if you handle them well. By overcoming these challenges in your caring ministry, you will be able to help those who hurt in a way that demonstrates your maturity and integrity.


The Nine Resources for Caring




The seventh and final thing that this book teaches you is how to access the nine resources for caring. These are the sources of support and assistance that can help you become a more effective caregiver. They are:



  • God: You care for others by relying on His power, wisdom, and love, not by depending on your own abilities or resources.



  • Scripture: You care for others by studying and applying His word, not by following your own opinions or preferences.



  • Prayer: You care for others by communicating with Him regularly and sincerely, not by ignoring or neglecting Him.



  • Church: You care for others by being part of His body and family, not by isolating or separating yourself from them.



  • Community: You care for others by collaborating with other people and organizations that share your vision and mission, not by competing or conflicting with them.



  • Mentor: You care for others by learning from someone who has more experience and expertise than you, not by being arrogant or ignorant.



  • Peer: You care for others by sharing with someone who has similar interests and goals as you, not by being secretive or selfish.



  • Counselor: You care for others by seeking help from someone who has professional training and skills in caring, not by being proud or stubborn.



  • Coach: You care for others by receiving guidance from someone who can help you improve your performance and potential in caring, not by being complacent or stagnant.



These resources are based on the principle and practice of interdependence and teamwork that acknowledge the need and value of others in caring ministry. They are also available and accessible, meaning that you can find and use them easily if you look for them. By accessing these resources in your caring ministry, you will be able to help those who hurt in a way that enhances your competence and effectiveness.


Conclusion




In conclusion, Helping Those Who Hurt: A Handbook for Caring and Crisis is a book that can help you become a more effective caregiver. It teaches you how to understand the four stages of crisis, follow the seven principles of caring, master the ten skills of caring, provide the five types of caring, offer the six areas of caring, overcome the eight challenges of caring, and access the nine resources for caring. By applying these teachings in your life and ministry, you will be able to help those who hurt in a way that shows God's love and compassion to them.


If you are interested in learning more about this book or buying a copy, you can visit its website at https://www.navpress.com/p/helping-those-who-hurt/9781600063824. You can also read some reviews and testimonials from other readers who have benefited from this book. We hope that this article has given you a helpful overview of what this book offers and why it is a valuable resource for anyone who wants to help those who hurt.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about the book or the topic:



  • Who is the author of this book?



The author of this book is Barbara Roberts, a licensed professional counselor and the director of Caring Ministry at First Evangelical Free Church in Colorado Springs, Colorado. She has over 30 years of experience in counseling and caring ministry. She is also a speaker, trainer, consultant, and writer on various topics related to caring ministry.


  • Who is this book for?



This book is for anyone who wants to help those who hurt, whether they are laypeople or professional counselors. It is especially useful for those who are involved in caring ministry in churches or other organizations. It is also suitable for those who are going through a crisis themselves or know someone who is.


  • What are the benefits of reading this book?



Some of the benefits of reading this book are:


  • You will develop your skills and confidence in communicating and connecting with those who hurt.



  • You will gain insight and wisdom from biblical teachings and examples of how Jesus cared for people.



  • You will discover various resources and tools that can support and equip you for caring ministry.



  • You will grow in your faith and character as you face and overcome the challenges of caring ministry.



  • How can I apply what I learn from this book?



Some of the ways that you can apply what you learn from this book are:


  • You can use the book as a reference or a guide when you encounter someone who is hurting or going through a crisis.



  • You can use the book as a study or a training material for yourself or for others who are interested in caring ministry.



  • You can use the book as a devotional or a meditation tool to reflect on God's word and His ways of caring for people.



  • You can use the book as a source of inspiration or encouragement to motivate you to care for others with love and compassion.



  • Where can I find more information or help on this topic?



Some of the places where you can find more information or help on this topic are:


  • You can visit the website of NavPress, the publisher of this book, at https://www.navpress.com/. There you can find other books and resources on caring ministry and related topics.



  • You can visit the website of Caring Ministry at First Evangelical Free Church, where the author works, at https://www.firstfree.org/ministries/caring-ministry/. There you can find more information and services on caring ministry and related topics.



  • You can visit the website of American Association of Christian Counselors, a professional organization for Christian counselors, at https://www.aacc.net/. There you can find more information and resources on counseling and related topics.



  • You can visit the website of Focus on the Family, a Christian ministry that provides help and advice for families, at https://www.focusonthefamily.com/. There you can find more information and resources on family and related topics.



71b2f0854b


Acerca de

¡Te damos la bienvenida al grupo! Puedes conectarte con otro...
bottom of page